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skippy_kat

Your Favourite Album?

Best Album  

423 members have voted

  1. 1. Best Album

    • Showbiz
      12
    • OoS
      148
    • Absolution
      164
    • BHaR
      62
    • The Resistance
      30
    • The 2nd Law
      5
    • Drones
      2


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There's a video for Redemption?!?!?!

Anyway yeah I love all the songs even though I hated Uprising when it was first on the radio (I was like 13 and thought I was supposed to hate everything on the radio)

But the thing that always got me is that Resistance is one of my top Muse songs (I thought it was so beautiful when I first heard it) and I remember thinking that TR must be a fan favorite album. When I first saw someone say "I think I prefer older Muse" I thought it was a minority opinion. It was weird being that wrong lol

 

it's a phenomenon, I do this too... let's call it 'newer album cynicism'... you love an older album so much your mind kind of dismisses the idea that anything new by that band could possibly be as good. It always takes me years to appreciate a new Muse album on its own merits; not so much these days but I was really guilty of it with BHaR. 'Nope, nope, Starlight is shit, therefore nope.' Wrote it off completely, in my mind. Took me until 2010-2011 to realise it's actually a good album. lol. I did it with QOTSA as well, anything after Songs for the Deaf was 'Nope, nopenopenope' until I actually listened properly to the newer stuff and realised its amazeness.

 

And it's impossible to get people away from the cynicism, even when you think they've proved themselves wrong! My mate recently kept on about how he loves a recent song by a band who he'd written off in this way. I said, 'yes that is a great song and the album it is on is equally incredible'... and he STILL goes 'Oh no it's all about *previous album*, nothing beats *previous album*.'

 

but... you just said... :rolleyes:

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it's a phenomenon, I do this too... let's call it 'newer album cynicism'... you love an older album so much your mind kind of dismisses the idea that anything new by that band could possibly be as good. It always takes me years to appreciate a new Muse album on its own merits; not so much these days but I was really guilty of it with BHaR. 'Nope, nope, Starlight is shit, therefore nope.' Wrote it off completely, in my mind. Took me until 2010-2011 to realise it's actually a good album. lol. I did it with QOTSA as well, anything after Songs for the Deaf was 'Nope, nopenopenope' until I actually listened properly to the newer stuff and realised its amazeness.

 

And it's impossible to get people away from the cynicism, even when you think they've proved themselves wrong! My mate recently kept on about how he loves a recent song by a band who he'd written off in this way. I said, 'yes that is a great song and the album it is on is equally incredible'... and he STILL goes 'Oh no it's all about *previous album*, nothing beats *previous album*.'

 

but... you just said... :rolleyes:

 

While it is true most bands tend to make their best material earlier in their careers, I do agree with this idea, as it shows up everywhere.

 

 

Take Rush for instance after a classic run of albums in the seventies and early eighties, a less widely loved run of albums in the mid and late eighties, a rather controversial set of albums in the nineties, and some slightly less controversial albums in the 2000s, they released one of their greatest albums of all time in 2012, Clockwork Angels, comparable in quality to their best seventiest material, at least in this fan's eyes and ears. This album also coincided with an astounding late career increase in popularity and public adoration for a band that had for so long been known as the "largest cult band in the world," highlighted by a wonderfully made rockumentary, a movie cameo or two, and (at long awaited last) a memorable induction into the rock and roll hall of fame. In addition, Clockwork Angels was the first full concept album by a band that had long been known for crazy prog-rock concepts in their music, with an accompanying novel that was enjoyable to say the least. Album highlights include some of their best songs/material in ages, a return to the sci-fi/fantasy concepts which dominated their beloved seventies releases, 3 songs clocking in at over seven minutes (the first time new Rush songs had been so long since 1981's classic Moving Pictures album), astounding playing from all three members to prove they have never been better musicians, Geddy Lee's vocals managing to recreate their 70s intensity without having to reach as high as they once could, and many other classic elements. This is seen by members if the band as one of their three best albums of all time, along with the seminal releases of 2112 and Moving Pictures. Nevertheless, three years later after the new album hype has worn off, many die-hard fans refuse to admit its classic nature and epic quality. What could they possibly have to complain about concerning such a great record, you ask? The production, apparently. These fans refuse to recognize this album's greatness simply because it is one of the many victims of the "loudness wars" which dominate modern music. Reasonable reasoning for hating the album? Perhaps, but what may be more likely is that these fans refuse to believe anything could possibly top if come close to topping the classic releases of the band's "golden era." A real shame if you ask me.

 

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While it is true most bands tend to make their best material earlier in their careers, I do agree with this idea, as it shows up everywhere.

 

 

Take Rush for instance after a classic run of albums in the seventies and early eighties, a less widely loved run of albums in the mid and late eighties, a rather controversial set of albums in the nineties, and some slightly less controversial albums in the 2000s, they released one of their greatest albums of all time in 2012, Clockwork Angels, comparable in quality to their best seventiest material, at least in this fan's eyes and ears. This album also coincided with an astounding late career increase in popularity and public adoration for a band that had for so long been known as the "largest cult band in the world," highlighted by a wonderfully made rockumentary, a movie cameo or two, and (at long awaited last) a memorable induction into the rock and roll hall of fame. In addition, Clockwork Angels was the first full concept album by a band that had long been known for crazy prog-rock concepts in their music, with an accompanying novel that was enjoyable to say the least. Album highlights include some of their best songs/material in ages, a return to the sci-fi/fantasy concepts which dominated their beloved seventies releases, 3 songs clocking in at over seven minutes (the first time new Rush songs had been so long since 1981's classic Moving Pictures album), astounding playing from all three members to prove they have never been better musicians, Geddy Lee's vocals managing to recreate their 70s intensity without having to reach as high as they once could, and many other classic elements. This is seen by members if the band as one of their three best albums of all time, along with the seminal releases of 2112 and Moving Pictures. Nevertheless, three years later after the new album hype has worn off, many die-hard fans refuse to admit its classic nature and epic quality. What could they possibly have to complain about concerning such a great record, you ask? The production, apparently. These fans refuse to recognize this album's greatness simply because it is one of the many victims of the "loudness wars" which dominate modern music. Reasonable reasoning for hating the album? Perhaps, but what may be more likely is that these fans refuse to believe anything could possibly top if come close to topping the classic releases of the band's "golden era." A real shame if you ask me.

 

I kind of feel it's a nostalgia factor and that these albums remain constant while time goes on. You tend to associate albums with the time of their release etc. and how you were feeling then, ultimately influencing how much you like them. It's not the songs getting worse or better, it's your opinion about the songs getting worse or better. That and people don't like change. But then everybody else is like "Stop with the repetitive BS". Either way you cannot win, because everyone is different and everybody changes.

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I kind of feel it's a nostalgia factor and that these albums remain constant while time goes on. You tend to associate albums with the time of their release etc. and how you were feeling then, ultimately influencing how much you like them. It's not the songs getting worse or better, it's your opinion about the songs getting worse or better. That and people don't like change. But then everybody else is like "Stop with the repetitive BS". Either way you cannot win, because everyone is different and everybody changes.

 

:thumbsup:

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