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DPTP - cut out the top and bottom and distort. Maybe add some shit reverb.

 

I have worked hard for the last six months on attaining a thick, balanced drum sound from my small room. Obviously close-miking the individual drums poses no problem, but getting an even balance from all the cymbals by using just two overhead mics has been a cowson to say the least.

 

I've tried every combination under the sun (including recorderman) and what works best for me is nothing fancy, and is to have the overheads directly over the cymbals. I had to watch it though as on the hat side, the crash was blocking the mic's "sight-line" to the snare (I was getting loads of snare and hat on the ride side of the kit), so I had to bring the mic to a position over the hat and angle it back towards the crash. Both mics are the same distance from the snare (I got the tape measure out, to avoiding phasing) and both are about a foot above the crashes. Changing my setup had alot to do with it though, I had to move the cymbals to the left or right, or up or down, so they fitted with where I wanted them in the stereo image and could all be heard at the same volume.

 

Interesting! I've been moving my mics further over the cymbals recently. I used to use a pair of condensors just in front of the kit, equal distance from the kick and snare. I've found that using my shit sony stereo mic in this position gives a nice image, so now I have my condensors right over the top of the cymbals and it's working great.

 

Another thing i've been doing is to have a mic over the stair well in my studio and using it for sub bass on the drum kit. I line it up so the kicks are in time with the close mic and roll off everything over 100Hz - it really adds a load of punch. I've no idea why I get so much bass in the stair well but I do!

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Interesting! I've been moving my mics further over the cymbals recently. I used to use a pair of condensors just in front of the kit, equal distance from the kick and snare. I've found that using my shit sony stereo mic in this position gives a nice image, so now I have my condensors right over the top of the cymbals and it's working great.

 

Another thing i've been doing is to have a mic over the stair well in my studio and using it for sub bass on the drum kit. I line it up so the kicks are in time with the close mic and roll off everything over 100Hz - it really adds a load of punch. I've no idea why I get so much bass in the stair well but I do!

 

Yeah, there's no set it stone method for miking kits up, you just have to find your own formula with what you've got. I tried having the OHs in front of the kit (thought it would sound "natural", since only the drummer hears the kit from behind) but it didn't work, though I find that having the overheads behind the kit and pointing towards the cymbals can give a sound that's closer to what you hear from behind the kit.

 

You roll off and still get loads of bass? Sick :D The next room along from my drum room is a bathroom - I just ordered a room mic and should be able to get some great reflections by throwing the door to the drum room open.

Edited by Beat Poet
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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...

http://soundcloud.com/d0mgreen/sets/year-13-assignments/

 

Handed in a week ago. Computers at college kept crashing so didn't get to finish as much as I had hoped. And I apologise for those vocals. Really, was a nightmare getting someone to sing for me, and then a whole other nightmare unfolded...but they sound so much better now

 

http://soundcloud.com/d0mgreen/sets/year-13-assignments/

 

On there is Don't Sit Down 'Cause I've Moved Your Chair, Crying Lightning and Machines

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  • 2 weeks later...

I cranked my amp and played pretty much every song i know. When i face the cab it sounds pretty vintage like Clapton. (this is not a compliment i think) The very high end have some vintage lo-fi harshness. But then i changed my position quite significantly and the tone suddenly became pretty cool. (better than any drive pedal i have heard)

This is pretty well known i think that you get the most treble when you face the speaker.

 

Can i mimic the same changes with mic positioning? (eventually i wanna get an sm57 for recording stuff) Is it possible to get both tones (not at the same time ofc) by changing the mic's position?

 

I know that there is a tone difference between putting the mic closer to the dustcap or the edges of the speaker, can you cover every change in sound you would get by walking around the room by moving the mic around the speaker cloth?

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I cranked my amp and played pretty much every song i know. When i face the cab it sounds pretty vintage like Clapton. (this is not a compliment i think) The very high end have some vintage lo-fi harshness. But then i changed my position quite significantly and the tone suddenly became pretty cool. (better than any drive pedal i have heard)

This is pretty well known i think that you get the most treble when you face the speaker.

 

Can i mimic the same changes with mic positioning? (eventually i wanna get an sm57 for recording stuff) Is it possible to get both tones (not at the same time ofc) by changing the mic's position?

 

I know that there is a tone difference between putting the mic closer to the dustcap or the edges of the speaker, can you cover every change in sound you would get by walking around the room by moving the mic around the speaker cloth?

 

Yes you can.

 

Generally the best idea is to set the sound by directly facing the speaker, but if you find it sounds better off-axis, then mic it up off-axis as well.

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Yes you can.

 

Generally the best idea is to set the sound by directly facing the speaker, but if you find it sounds better off-axis, then mic it up off-axis as well.

 

So i set up the mic off axis by around 45° would be similar to my IRL position on the pic?

 

Then i just move the mic horizontally till i find a place where the treble sounds good?

 

 

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i was also about 1m higher that the cab if it matters

 

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Your issue there might be picking up too much of the room through the mic at that distance. A SM57 might sound a bit thin as well as it has the bass roll-off to compensate for proximity effect. If you have a microphone with a flatter frequency response, try that.

 

And how high you are from the cab does make a distance!

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Your issue there might be picking up too much of the room through the mic at that distance. A SM57 might sound a bit thin as well as it has the bass roll-off to compensate for proximity effect. If you have a microphone with a flatter frequency response, try that.

 

I don't want room reverb so i try to get as close to the cab as possible. The pic shows where i stand in respect to the cab while playing guitar when i liked the tone the most.

 

What i wanted to know is: is it possible to get that tone while my microphone is almost touching the speaker. (shit now that you mention it i realized that then the proximity effect will alter my tone)

 

(btw in my case a bit (or even a lot) of bass roll-off is not a bad thing, i actually want to put (or make it switchable) a smaller cap between the preamp tube and the output tube because i think it sounds a bit bassy when cranked)

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I don't want room reverb so i try to get as close to the cab as possible. The pic shows where i stand in respect to the cab while playing guitar when i liked the tone the most.

 

What i wanted to know is: is it possible to get that tone while my microphone is almost touching the speaker. (shit now that you mention it i realized that then the proximity effect will alter my tone)

 

(btw in my case a bit (or even a lot) of bass roll-off is not a bad thing, i actually want to put (or make it switchable) a smaller cap between the preamp tube and the output tube because i think it sounds a bit bassy when cranked)

 

Maybe try it 6 inches away at the angle you're at. That should be as close as you can get without proximity effect.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Is it possible to use more than one soundcard at the same time or should i invest in a card with multiple outputs? (i wanna send softsynths to my amp and drums into a normal speaker from my DAW (reaper) at the same time)

 

(i have several external usb soundcards (2-3 non-studio quality Asus soundcards for laptops and a pretty good DAC) but i think you can select only one device in Reaper)

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;9466029']ive never found a way, unless you hook a soundcard up to a line in of the primary soundcard...which would then effectively use the old bouncing method, leaving you with mono tracks.

so get a bigger soundcard

 

that kinda sucks, i've been able to use an interface and a soundcard at the same time in the past, i thought this is possible too

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