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The Sampling/Remixing Thread


theanatomyofguns
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Share your remixes, sampling tips and tricks, software you use etc in this thread.

 

I'll start, here is a track I made using samples from "Eleanor Rigby" by The Beatles, "Release The Beast" by Breakwater, "Fire" by The Young Punx and "Technologic" by Daft Punk (a "mash up" if you will) - http://www.mediafire.com/download.php?eywtxjd0tdd

 

We could also use it as like a Wheres Wally? but with samples :awesome:

 

PS: Inb4 everything ever

Edited by theanatomyofguns
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Lay it on me, my bro's rlly into it so im kinda used to it by now :p

 

haha wkd :) just to clarify i mean dance hardcore.. not saying you dont know that already ! just some people assume "hardcore" is RAWRRR ill get some ready to upload to this thread 2moro (Y)

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
;6370285']can someone give me a dummies guide to remixing!? i love listening to remixes' date=' i would love to make some remixes i just have no clue how! i have cubase se3, reason, and a juno g?![/quote']

There is no hard and fast method and I suspect everyone does it differently... This is a basic rundown of my method:

 

 

1. Find the 'hook(s)' and isolate them from original track - could be vocals/bassline/riffs/etc

2. Cut up original backing to create loopable building blocks for new chorus/verse/breakdown/etc

3. At this point you should know whether you need to replace any instruments... Drums usually, often bass (synth and bass guitar) - although as a rough rule you want to keep any 'signature' sounds, whether instrument or synth (see 1.)

4. Arrange building blocks into rough song structure

5. Add in hooks and rearrange structure as necessary

6. Now you should have a bare-bones mix and it's time to add any extra parts and polish.

 

 

All this is much easier with stems/multitracks - if you're working from a stereo mix you're pretty much limited to cutting it up, rearranging sections and perhaps adding a cheesy beat :)

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  • 3 years later...
You need an editor. Lots of raw ideas there for someone to work with but no focus. Particularly regarding structure...

 

this is relevant to my interests, but i don't quite get what you mean.

 

Am i right in saying that you think that there's the bones of tracks there, but, they need a lot of tidying up and refining?

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this is relevant to my interests, but i don't quite get what you mean.

 

Am i right in saying that you think that there's the bones of tracks there, but, they need a lot of tidying up and refining?

 

Partly yes - from my quick skim through the other day it seemed there wasn't much structure. It's quite important to have fairly defined intros/themes/buildups/breakdowns/outros/etc (and to have them at standard lengths - generally multiples of 16 bars) because it gives the track tension/energy and the DJ something to work with that is predictable to mix. Once you've got a working structure, then you can refine the transitions and embellish a bit - maybe stretch out a breakdown by an extra bar to maintain the suspense/etc.

Can't really comment on the sound itself because I'm listening through shitty built in speakers but the other reason I think you'd do well working with someone else is that it's often hard to self-censure. People often cram too many ideas into one track or do the opposite and let one idea run on far too long. Obviously both of those things come down to feel and are totally subjective but I find a second opinion helps - at the very least you have to think about and justify why you've done something!

As an example, I think your Rach track is a brilliant idea but it needs a serious re-edit. Don't just let the track play over your bass/drums, cut out the bars/phrases that really pop and stitch them back together to re-make it in a dance-able way. Repeat stuff so it gets rammed into everyone's heads, then move to a new section and FUCK SHIT UP.

:)

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those kind of tips/criticism are really super constructive, so cheers! It really is appreciated.

 

looking at my tracks, I get what you mean by all of it, and I can think of good examples by big name artists that would serve as a good example of how to do some of those things very well. I've been getting friends of mine to give me their opinion, but that's always going to be biased. On the plus side, this is all just a hobby for me at the moment. I still have uni to finish off, so for the moment, I'm just making tracks as a hobby. However, what is very helpful about me going back to uni in january is that I've been in contact with the dj society. It's probably a good place to get opinions.

 

As much as I'm going to go try those kind of things myself, do you think it would be worth my while, for example, to go do a set of lessons in ableton? I've seen some very good online ones, and there's a few places around that do them too.

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  • 2 years later...

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