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Neil, I forget what brand my clear decals were. I looked at getting them professionally done but in my case, they needed a huge lot done, for about $30. That would have made 14 pedals worth IIRC and of course, they don't always go on seamlessly. I also note that the decal itself looks kind of crackly when the clear goes on. Not that it's horrible but I don't know. I'm trying to see if I can do a screen print setup here.

 

James, Got a pic? I can't recall what they look like.

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Neil, I forget what brand my clear decals were. I looked at getting them professionally done but in my case, they needed a huge lot done, for about $30. That would have made 14 pedals worth IIRC and of course, they don't always go on seamlessly. I also note that the decal itself looks kind of crackly when the clear goes on. Not that it's horrible but I don't know. I'm trying to see if I can do a screen print setup here.

 

James, Got a pic? I can't recall what they look like.

 

oh actually, my girlfriend and I were looking at screenprint kits last week. There's a place saved on her ipad that I'll find out, but as far as I can remember, they had 1 colour kits for about $200 and two colour kits for about $250. And that included everything to make the screens and printing (although I am led to believe that getting a screen made professionally is cheap and worth it.)

 

I'm quite interested in the stenciling option. Turns out that the only thing that will melt this plastic is acetone, and I'm fairly sure that isn't in spraypaint? In anycase, I'm spending half the day today doing some work on my 3d printer, and the second half studying architectural procurement and contracts. Hooray for exams.

 

My list for the printer before it's back up and running is getting longer though, it's now at:

1. Wire up the ATX Power Supply

2. Wire up the SSR

3. Modify the arduino code for the new heatbed setup

4. Wire up and mount the new heatbed

5. ?????

6. PROFIT

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See, if I can get two colour kits, I'm golden. That's why I've stuck to the ultimately simple design for my erm... regular products. So seriously, if you do find that link, let me know.

 

Take one guess what a fellow bassist (not on this board) has asked me to build for them? Give you a hint, I'd be perma'd if I said it. Every. Fucking. Time. It'll be the fourth one I've made.

 

I've had to delay the order from the new supplier. Turns out this Christmas thing got in the way. Ugh.

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I have a feeling it could have been this one...

http://diyprintshop.myshopify.com/collections/screen-printing-kits

 

In anycase, there is a lot of "tabletop" screenprint kits, and they all look pretty decent!

 

On a separate note, I'm pricing up a cheap bass rig, so I can also build bass effects. Like what Matt was saying, I've noticed that the Black Russian muff seems to be a very popular choice for bassists, so it would be nice to have a basic bass rig to work with. I'm looking at a guitar, a 2 x 12 cab and a hybrid head, maybe something similar for a guitar rig and have an amp switch pedal.

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James, Got a pic? I can't recall what they look like.

 

 

electro-harmonix-big-muff-pi-russian-710205.jpg

 

 

Neal, have you ever tried making a big muff with real tubes before? Apparently the one on this amp project turned out quite well, but I don't know just how many changes the circuit went through to accommodate the tubes. He did say it's based on the big muff schematic at least (though I'm not sure which one)

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I breadboarded it, but I actually think it's an entirely pointless exercise. There's two methods to it:

 

1. Tubes as clipping diodes

You can wire a twin-triode (eg, 12AX7) as two diodes. You still need the heaters going, and I think you need a decent anode voltage too. The idea behind it is that you use the tubes as clipping diodes for the two clipping stages of the muff (2 tubes in total) as tubes give very gentle clipping, even softer than germanium diodes. Any efforts of this I've heard, are desperately muddy and thick, and have a wierd microphonic sound to them. very nasty.

 

2. Tubes as gain stages

The second way, where the tubes are used in place of the transistors is a bit more flexible. You can still pick your favorite clipping, and you've good control over the rest of the circuit. However, in my opinion there's two main problems to this. Firstly, you need about 350V for the tubes, so the power supply is messy, and between transformers and everything else, it's an inefficient use of tubes in my opinion. Secondly, getting the circuit just right means you'll probably have to compare each gain stage separately, to get the gain from each tube right with what it would be in a transistor circuit. It strikes me as one of those "do-it-because-i-can" circuits.

 

Personally, there's so much scope to really tailor big muffs as is, just by sticking with the existing circuitry.

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He did it the second way apparently. I imagine the power supply isn't an issue since it's actually inside of an amp, but no idea about modifying the rest of the circuit. I'll have to look into it a bit more, and depending how it sounds, I might request one in a pedal format.

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He did it the second way apparently. I imagine the power supply isn't an issue since it's actually inside of an amp, but no idea about modifying the rest of the circuit. I'll have to look into it a bit more, and depending how it sounds, I might request one in a pedal format.

 

Yeah but think of it this way, you know the massive transformers at the back of a tube amp? You'll need at least one of those for the power supply of the tubes. So if you want a tube muff pedal, you'll need at least one of those big transformers in/on the pedal.

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I had one of those strange moments today where I am selling my parents business off to someone younger than me who proceeds to tell me her brother is a packaging and printing producer. I think I'm going to save a metric fuckton on packaging and decals if this deal pulls through too. Freaking international tradesman stuff going on here.

 

Made myself one of those woolen things. You know, the extinct kind. Finally played one with a passive bass and I can understand its merit now. Goes mental with my actives though.

 

Also, I'm considering making a cabinet simulator based off my SWR Goliath Cab so I can put my amp's preamp before it and get a close approximation of my tone. I just saw the frequency response and it explains my tone in a nutshell (basically, why I pull so many mids out of my head)

 

cab174x10SessionSWRGoliath-1.jpg

 

 

EDIT: At 800Hz too. Man I'm good.

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Crowella, Belton bricks, nope. They're shit.

 

Breadboarded up a fet version of the Fender 6G15 or whatever that standalone reverb is. Yes, it's a well known fact that the digilog chips are 3 cascading delay chips, but it sounds like it. Tracking is patchy in parts, sounds like a vibrato effect. The actual reverb, well there's a very noticible time delay between playing a note and getting sound back. It's shit. no two ways about it. Buy one of the accutronics small blue spring tanks. They've an impedance of 150R, and they're proper spring tanks. Don't buy a belton chip, ever.

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I called it. I never heard one convincing Belton brick. Always had a slapback delay sound to me. That's why I wasn't considering them for a reverb.

 

I'll have to try the digital route but that's going to be a while now. Bought my parents business so that's now a priority over pedlols.

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seeing as how I need a break from studying construction legislation, I'm breadboarding one based on the blue spring reverb right now. Need to figure out how to deal with impedances though. it's got 150R input impedance and about 1500R output impedance. I would like to use fets so I can easily enough translate it to tubes, but i don't know much about working with impedances.

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Ok so this is all getting very tricky...

 

The idea is to end up with a totally analog reverb in an enclosure that's not the same size as the fender standalone reverb unit thing. By totally analog, I mean tubes and springs. Here's the approach thus far:

 

The power supply is to be done by a nixie SMPS:

 

 

NixieSMPS.jpg

 

 

 

The spring reverb tank is to be an accutronics AMC2BF3, which is about the smallest they come. It roughly measures 135x50x35mm, so there's a selection of diecast enclosures it'll fit into.

 

The tubes, which I've ordered, are 6N16-B russian submini twin triodes. They're medium mu, so spot on for the task at hand.

 

By the looks of things, I'm possibly going to need 2 tubes, which is not ideal, but because of an impedance of 150R, I think the driver alone will need 2 x 6N16-B. In hindsight, a submini pentode-triode tube would have been a better choice, but I'm not giving up just yet. Control wise, my instinct is to go Dwell, Mix, Feedback and Volume, with an internal trimmer to adjust the pre-gain. Ambitious, yes, but certainly not the most complex of projects by a long way.

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If you connect the reverb to something with high input impedance (like the usual 1Mohm or even down to 100k) then the output impedance is cool.

The input impedance is too low for most previous stages imo, i would stick an unity gain opamp buffer in front of it.

Or you can put a tube stage there with high input impedance and low output impedance (it should be around a few ohms like below 15ohms)

Sometimes they let the verb to load down your signal for more vintage.

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Yeah see if its gonna be 2 tubes, that gives me 4 triodes. Ideally, 2 before and 2 after, as I'm going to use a simple tonestack for a tone dampening effect. Thing is, I know how to make a triode stage shouty, but I don't understand how to make it high or low impedance.

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Yeah see if its gonna be 2 tubes, that gives me 4 triodes. Ideally, 2 before and 2 after, as I'm going to use a simple tonestack for a tone dampening effect. Thing is, I know how to make a triode stage shouty, but I don't understand how to make it high or low impedance.

 

An emitter follower (in case of BJTs) have high input impedance and low output impedance which would be perfect in your case. In case of FETs this configuration is called common drain. These are unity gain btw. This configuration probably exists in the world of tubes too in which case it would be called something like common plate but i dont know much about tubes.

I would use a FET opamp unity gain buffer, it wont make it less analog.

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Hmmm... Well it's going to be a little while before I get onto it in any case. I've my exams in 5 days, and I've a few other things to build first. But I'd ideally like to be able to go down the tube route.

 

Until then, back to the joys of contract administration and certification. I fucking less than three arkitekshur.

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alright gentlemen

 

what are the most common ways to add more gains and sustain to a fuzz face without adding any extra controls and stuff? I just want to change out a few components to voice the thing properly and forget about it.

 

It sounds good as is - better than the average off the shelf fuzz face clone really, but could be better. I also never figured out why it's a bit on the quiet side... doesn't really get much louder than the bypassed signal.

 

Gut shot:

 

bNzS97q.jpg

 

Don't ask why I used NOS parts. I don't know either.

 

I might switch out the transistors just to see what the alternatives are. They're AC128s that I got from eastern Europe, and they're supposedly legit.

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I think you cant really get more gain out of the circuit without changing something fundamental about the sound.

(i think your choices are using a simple clean booster before the FF but then it will get

fizzy due to the disappearing loading effect on you pickups or you can mess with the

value of the 100k feedback resistor (raising it) but then it might start oscillating or you can use higher hfe/"gain" silicon transistors but then you will loose the germanium sound.)

 

Alternatively you can try googling a pickup simulator circuit you can stick between the booster and the FF to restore the impedance loading effects, this way you can theoretically use the fuzz face or fuzz factory anywhere in the signal chain.

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i swapped the 100k for a 56k or 47k on the fuzz im working on. it gets very fuzzy, but i like it that way.

 

it's not a fuzz face is it?

 

I piggybacked a 33k with the 100k, as some of my voltages for Q1 seemed a bit off (from what I found online). I am removing it post haste.

 

What's interesting though, is how much Q2 has drifted since I last checked it. It was set at -5.2 before iirc, and it was at -6.4 yesterday. Probably will just dial it in again by foot

 

edit: that was before I put the 33k resistor in.

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Ignore voltages. Running it parallel (calling it piggybacking sounds weird and sexual) will give you a resistance of 66.5k. You would be better off putting in a 10k in parallel, gets you to 55k. You could even go lower than that. Put it in there, ignore voltages, plug it in and see how it sounds. What schematic/kit did you use originally?

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