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100k for the tone pot? Never heard of anything under 250k being used (at least for passive pickups)

 

Might have to open up this 84 standard to see if it has the same configuration. Nice sounding guitar anyway

 

Fuck it, it's only a cheap kit anyway. It's worth a go.

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Fuck it, it's only a cheap kit anyway. It's worth a go.

 

Oh I wasn't disagreeing, I just found it a bit unusual (and I always thought 300k volume pots was a more recent change, but I guess not). Interested to hear what you think anyway.

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the expensive euro store. Couldn't figure out the whole process of ordering it from Japan

 

I might, but I don't know if it'll be worth it. I'm surprised no one has already done this though, but I figure they're the same as me

 

From the information that is available and any sound clips etc, would you say that this pedal is comparable to anything else out there?

 

No news yet btw.

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No problem. Hasn't been 4-6 weeks yet

 

 

 

human gear animato

 

I do wonder how useful it is with guitar. The clone (no idea how accurate it was) was absolutely useless

 

What a bizarre pedal it sounds like the perfect blend of octave fuzz and distortion :) I like it a lot and all the secrecy on the inside only makes me more interested :D

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  • 3 months later...
Interesting, must have missed your batsignal in this thread a while ago.

Do you know where it connects to?? Beneath the goop is a transistor, a cap and three resistors(possibly diodes).

 

I can't find out unless I lift the board (and break it in the process)

 

Could that be where the distortion is happening? Maybe it's some special arrangement used by many pedal builders that they want to keep secret

 

It's certainly a unique sounding pedal, but it has this annoying decay to the notes.

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NeilDOT! :D

 

What yer building?

 

A full tube, full spring reverb, in a type DD box

A full tube preamp based on a Silverstone twin 12 in a type JJ box

An analog delay based on the PT2399 chip

 

There's a couple of other ones too, but just things like boosts, Fuzzes, and maybe a fkr.

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Niel!

 

What's this reverb going to be based off? Or is it going to be an original design?

 

I know you linked a special standalone reverb tank to me a while back (which I recently went back to, as I'm currently looking for one) but it's discontinued

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Its got elements from a few different reverbs. There are some that have nice driver sections, but not good recovery. Others use clever clipping techniques, and the feedback loop feature is something I like. Plus, I'm going to allow the gain to be controlled to the point of adding a little crunch ala sigur ros. The tank in question is one of these accutronics ones https://www.tubesandmore.com/products/P-RAMC2BF3

 

Another pedal I'm working on is a solderless one. Completely solderless. Yes, you read that correctly.

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  • 2 weeks later...

ok, starting on the first of the projects; a modified version of the four-knob rat.

 

2r5dqae.jpg

 

From left to right, the first 4 knobs are: Volume, Drive, Tone and Presence. The last 3 are where i have 2 choices, and I'm not so sure which would be more.... interesting.

 

The idea is, there's 2 places in a rat where clipping is often done, feedback clipping, and the usual distortion type clipping. On top of that, there's tonnes of options for hard to soft clipping, as well as symmetrical vs asymmetrical clipping. The controls I have made allowances for there are 1 x DPDT On-On switch, 1 x 6PDT rotary switch, 1 x DPDT On-Off-On switch. So at the moment, I'm considering 2 options for these three being the clipping controls.

 

OPTION 1: SYMMETRICAL/ASYMMETRICAL

The first switch acts as a selector for the rotary switch, between sym and asym clipping. The rotary goes from soft clipping to hard clipping, and the third switch is sym/off/asym clipping for the feedback stage.

 

OPTION 2: SOFT/HARD CLIPPING

The first switch acts as a selector for the rotary switch, between soft and hard clipping. On soft, the rotary positions for clipping will be: None, Tube, Germanium, Germanium ASYM, Silicon, Silicon Asym. On hard, the rotary positions will be: Zener, Zener Asym, LED, LED ASYM, Opamp, Opamp ASYM. The final switch will be soft/off/hard for feedback clipping

 

The other difficulty is that I like the idea of an opamp being used for a nearly square wave, but I cant seem to find anywhere online with a schematic for using an opamp as clipping diodes.

 

Opinions ideas?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Got bored. Starting modifying the bazz fuss circuit. Chucked a BMP input and output stage, implemented a simple tone control to cut treble and also added a notch feature to remove some of the "mud" around the 300Hz range.

 

Sim'd a demo in LTSpice. So this is how the computer generates this fuzzy circuit. I'm actually impressed. Sure, not the greatest sound but I wasn't expecting much from this. Maybe a little bit too much scoop but happy none the less that the software can do this easily enough.

[soundcloud]

[/soundcloud]

 

And here is the stock bazz fuss for comparison

 

[soundcloud]

[/soundcloud]
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The other difficulty is that I like the idea of an opamp being used for a nearly square wave, but I cant seem to find anywhere online with a schematic for using an opamp as clipping diodes.

 

Opinions ideas?

 

I have some for the opamp:

 

(these are different ways to do it)

1. set the gain to high as fuck

2. get an opamp with a really low supply voltage (like 1.5V) so even a slightly boosted signal will clip it.

(at this point you should probably use a regulator to supply the opamp with a lower voltage)

3. set the opamp up as a comparator. one input (lets say IN+) should be your sineish guitar signal, other input (IN-) should be the voltage your sineish signal is wobbling around (it is generally 0V)

then the opamps output will be a huge square wave. You can even do PWM on the square by fucking with the voltage on (IN-)

at this point you could even do digital shit with your square wave like dividing it down with counter ICs for various octave downs or you could try some octave ups with phase locked loops.

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I have some for the opamp:

 

(these are different ways to do it)

1. set the gain to high as fuck

2. get an opamp with a really low supply voltage (like 1.5V) so even a slightly boosted signal will clip it.

(at this point you should probably use a regulator to supply the opamp with a lower voltage)

3. set the opamp up as a comparator. one input (lets say IN+) should be your sineish guitar signal, other input (IN-) should be the voltage your sineish signal is wobbling around (it is generally 0V)

then the opamps output will be a huge square wave. You can even do PWM on the square by fucking with the voltage on (IN-)

at this point you could even do digital shit with your square wave like dividing it down with counter ICs for various octave downs or you could try some octave ups with phase locked loops.

 

Oooh that does sound like a good way to do it. I thought you had to set it up like clipping diodes with a dual op amp, but after much research, this seems to be the way to do it. Interestingly, the old Crash Sync which i breadboarded, does it with a 555 timer. It does look like it would make the circuit rather chunky though, and I've never had much luck with voltage regulator ICs, so I'm going to test out some other hard clipping solutions, like using 2 or 3 LEDs in each clipping sequence (ie., 2 x 2 in parallel).

 

Messing around with hard square waves is something I've always wanted to do, and have a rotary switch for changing it to triangle wave etc. There's a lot of really interesting things you can do with it, and it could make for a very interesting pedal, so this is something i will definitely look at in the near future.

 

Relevant to all this though, the first delivery of parts arrived.

2ugcjt3.jpg

 

..... what's he building in there.

 

Well one of the projects is going to be 4 x PNP base muffs, each slightly different, involving Silicon and germanium diodes and transistors, based on the Tone Wicker muff, and they'll probably all go up for sale in the near future. And yes, they'll run on a normal negative ground power supply. none of that positive ground fuzz face shite.

 

Other projects will be (in no particular order)

  • MXR MicroAmp (I'll be testing a variety of opamps on this)
  • Mega mega shouty boost, or something similar to the ohnoho blowing up idea. I've a 2, 4, 14 and 18W amp chip selection to see which gets closest
  • J201 based tremolo, like the vibracaster, but voiced more like a silvertone 1484 channel 2
  • some sort of 5-knob fuzz, maybe based on a fuzz face but with an extra transistor gain stage at the front
  • a tube based spring reverb, based on the one on gaussmarkov site
  • a tube based preamp, based on either the mesa mk2 or fender twin reverb

 

as you can guess, i'm hoping to see which i can cheaply produce, with a view to selling something(s)

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I forgot to say that these were 3 different ways to get an opamp clip, not 3 steps of the same process so for the comparator stuff you don't need different supply voltages or high gains.

 

Check out articles about synth VCOs, about half of their circuitry are about converting different waveforms to others.

 

Btw there are some problems with this comparator thing:

-its monophonic

-it tracks bad (dat well known cracking sound) when the string is about to go silent

-you lose your volume envelope (but that happene with most high gain stuff anyways)

-you need to put a high gain opamp o the frontend to get some of dat dere synthy sustain goodness

 

edit: there is a thread about schumann pll on diystompboxes which use some of these concepts, the circuit goes something like:

high gain-->comparator--->divider ic(octave down)--->pll ic with divider in the loop (octave up) ---->mixer

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