Jump to content

Dissertation help


Dominic.
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey guys. So I'm growing up and all and coming to the end of my undergrad degree and doing a dissertation and I decided to do it on the

Kemper

and modelling/profiling since I have one and all. Over the next few days I might ask a few questions here if anyone would be so kind to help and a questionnaire and some A/B test to get some feedback on.

 

Unfortunately I've been a mug and couldn't decide on what to write a dissertation on at the beginning of the year and have left it till 3 weeks before so that's a fuck up on my part

 

First of all can anyone point me in the direction of some good articles about modelling/profiling. Doesn't matter if they're recent or old-ish, in a way I'd quite like one from ten years ago. I'm planning on chatting in my lit review about a bunch of stuff from modelling amplifiers to DAW plugins that emulatehardware etc. That strain of stuff. If anyone knows any good ones that they can point me towards that'd be ace

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whats your argument? Surely something about simulation (profiling) v authenticity?

 

If so, look up Simulation & Simulacra by Baudrillard. Base it around that book but relate it to your amp. Look up things around people using profiling/amp sims, speak about the kenpers forerunners (line 6, axe fx etc).

 

I wrote mine in 3 weeks on Guitar Hero in the same vein (simulation v reality) and got an A.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whats your argument? Surely something about simulation (profiling) v authenticity?

 

 

 

If so, look up Simulation & Simulacra by Baudrillard. Base it around that book but relate it to your amp. Look up things around people using profiling/amp sims, speak about the kenpers forerunners (line 6, axe fx etc).

 

 

 

I wrote mine in 3 weeks on Guitar Hero in the same vein (simulation v reality) and got an A.

 

 

Cheers, this is the exact kind of stuff I'm looking for

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Conclusion could be along the lines that simulation will never replace traditional amplification wholesale, but the lines have been blurred sufficiently where major artists are increasingly embracing profiling over true amplification, quoting examples

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also curently pondering over my experiment. Obviously I'll want to profile an amp(s?) and compare the profile to the original. Considering doing a blind A/B test with a bunch of listeners, but also wondering if anyone knows if there's a freq analyser that can map two separate responses on the same graph if that makes sense?So it mesures the response of the Kemper and the original on the same chart

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also curently pondering over my experiment. Obviously I'll want to profile an amp(s?) and compare the profile to the original. Considering doing a blind A/B test with a bunch of listeners, but also wondering if anyone knows if there's a freq analyser that can map two separate responses on the same graph if that makes sense?So it mesures the response of the Kemper and the original on the same chart

 

 

Could get an oscilloscope i guess.

 

Or - do both. Blind tests, with a questionnaire. Probably the cheapest & fastest way to test it out.

 

Have at least one of the participants be a musician (accomplished, preferably)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Make it in Latex for maximum man points.

 

Mmhmm. All dat report format. Yum :) Latex is worth it.

 

Best thing for comparing would be an oscilloscope and do frequency tests for both. A blind test with people would be good too to see how that whole concept plays on people.

 

Totally interested with how this goes...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps in your blind test, don't ask which one people think is the original (this would require people with the ability to discern the two), but instead ask which one people think sounds better. I know it sounds silly but so often you see blind tests where they ask which one is the original and they fail because musicians claim to hear the 'mistakes' of a real amp. I think a straight quality question would bring up the debate of do people value perfection over genuineness.

 

Of course, I'm not the one doing the dissertation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps in your blind test, don't ask which one people think is the original (this would require people with the ability to discern the two), but instead ask which one people think sounds better. I know it sounds silly but so often you see blind tests where they ask which one is the original and they fail because musicians claim to hear the 'mistakes' of a real amp. I think a straight quality question would bring up the debate of do people value perfection over genuineness.

 

Of course, I'm not the one doing the dissertation.

 

 

Nah that's a good idea

 

The one thing I'm concerned about is that I've been a twat and left it too late so in a way wanna keep it as simple as I can while still getting a decent grade. I feel like I'd almost be opening a new can of worms if I went down that route but will try incorporate it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also curently pondering over my experiment. Obviously I'll want to profile an amp(s?) and compare the profile to the original. Considering doing a blind A/B test with a bunch of listeners, but also wondering if anyone knows if there's a freq analyser that can map two separate responses on the same graph if that makes sense?So it mesures the response of the Kemper and the original on the same chart

 

You need something capable of performing FFT. I used to use Soundforge back in the mists of time. There's probably an app for that now.

Really, you should use a class 1 sound level meter with 1/3rd octave capability as that will have a calibrated, repeatable response. Stick a pink noise sound source into the input, not a guitar.

 

However, truthfully I doubt any frequency scoping will give you what you want, as it won't take into account the transient nature of the tone. Effectively, you will just be scoping out the tone-stacks..

 

My advice is to limit the scope of your work to just a single variable.

Take a FFT of your amp, model it and compare it across a range of gains.

Limit your work to frequency only, using a pink noise input. That will give you scope for talking about how things like changing input impedances or tone stack values affect the real amp, and how they can be modelled.

 

If you start talking about convolving you're going to tie yourself up in a report that won't meet the deadline.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...