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Dailystar - Muse desperate to conquer America


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nobody here has been able to define "making it." I live in the US and have only been able to see muse at sold-out arenas since 2007. Even if they get no bigger, that's big enough to always make the US a part of the tour...the US just has so many cities.

 

They will play, and in all likelihood sellout Madison Square Garden for a third time now. By the VAST majority of definitions, that's making it. And the 3 sellouts will have each come in support of a different album.

 

If you only consider filling stadiums to be "conquering" America, then they have some work to do. But even then...I think they will get there sooner than later.

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Commercial success in the US doesn't look like success elsewhere in the world.

 

I don't think Muse would really want to be a commercial success in the US if they knew what that actually meant. Plenty of bands in the US fill stadiums and sell lots of records without reaching Justin Bieber or Nicki Minaj heights. I can understand wanting to sell records and fill stadiums here. They already do that. But I would have a real hard time with Muse if I saw them pitching soda, or appearing on American Idol or something. I'd rather they go on filling stadiums, selling records, winning Grammies, and staying OUT of the TMZ/Lindsay Lohan type media hype.

 

By that definition, and in every way that counts, they've already "conquered" America.

 

Matt has already been on American Idol. :LOL: But he was in the audience. Much to his embarrassment probably when the camera was shoved in his face :facepalm: It's quite funny though. :D

 

But anyway, I agree with you.

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It was Muse that said that... about their popularity in America

 

Oh was it? I thought it was more general. I thought they added to it saying they weren't famous like celebrities or something like that. But my memory is very hazy. Could they not have simply repeated it in relation to America?

 

You know when they were on the Jonathan Ross show last promotion, it was clear that he didn't have a clue who they were. It felt a bit embarrassing.

Edited by CarrieB
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Unless they've made a similar quote somewhere else (if anyone knows it post it please), there's this

 

EDIT: I found a more direct quote, but from the hecklerspray article, lol

 

Hmm, I think that might have been a rebranding of what they said or someone else said originally but I wouldn't have a clue where it was said. I have a vague memory that it may have been Chris who said it, but I may be completely wrong.

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The last album/tour really got their name more well known, so there's still room to become bigger over here. But I wish they wouldn't keep trying so hard to do so. They've already got the selling out arenas and headlining festivals down.

 

Yea. One has to wonder.... Why is it so fucking important for them to "conquer America"? Is THAT what they're thinking about when they're writing music? Are they thinking "Is this something that will sell in America?", because that could certainly be a contributing factor to the increasingly schizophrenic albums. It's a strange goal to have. I think it might do Matt "Ahab" Bellamy some good to re-examine his goals. ;)

 

Chris explained: “My generation made the effort to buy CDs and even if you were disappointed, you forced yourself to keep playing it. Unfortunately, people download things and forget about them.”

 

WTF is he saying? That people should continue to play CD's even if they suck?

 

Chris explained: “In the past, a group’s career may have been judged by albums. Today, bands have to provide a big spectacle.”

 

:facepalm:

 

I wonder if they'd concede they've "made it" in the US if they are offered the Superbowl halftime show.

 

I love American football, but ^^^this? :vomit:

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WTF is he saying? That people should continue to play CD's even if they suck?

 

 

 

I kind of see where he's coming from - some (of the best?) albums ever made are ones that don't necessarily instantly pop out at you. Some music requires the investment of time and attention - and that's something that's all but lost in this day and age. As everything is up-to-the-minute track by track iTunes chart single song downloads, the album format is dying. No one wants to invest their time (or money) into music anymore... And why should they? Just about anyone can make a DIY album these days, it doesn't take any talent or ability.

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“When I left the studio after having laid the foundations for the single Madness it was sparse.

 

“When I returned two days later, Chris and Dom Howard had put absolutely everything on it.”

 

This is the version of the song I wish to one day hear

 

I'd prefer they don't get any more popular here, if I'm completely honest.

 

I know what you mean...Muse used to be my little secret, now everybody seems to have at least heard of them...only not in the way that a person should be introduced to Muse unfortunately.

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Didn't they consider headlining Reading to have "made it" as a band? I'd think headlining Lolla, playing at the Grammys and winning one, double headlining with Rage Against the Machine, and all the other stuff they've done would be considered "making it" here.

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Didn't they consider headlining Reading to have "made it" as a band? I'd think headlining Lolla, playing at the Grammys and winning one, double headlining with Rage Against the Machine, and all the other stuff they've done would be considered "making it" here.

 

I think they want to sell out stadiums there too.

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I kind of see where he's coming from - some (of the best?) albums ever made are ones that don't necessarily instantly pop out at you. Some music requires the investment of time and attention - and that's something that's all but lost in this day and age. As everything is up-to-the-minute track by track iTunes chart single song downloads, the album format is dying. No one wants to invest their time (or money) into music anymore... And why should they? Just about anyone can make a DIY album these days, it doesn't take any talent or ability.

 

:stunned: Writing good music takes talent and ability. Period. Those artists that are talented generally get noticed. I think it's great that artists don't necessarily have to rely on corporate record labels for their success anymore.

 

And as far as how music sales work nowadays, I really don't agree. In fact, I'd argue that the way today's music sales work -- where people can listen to a decent snippet of any song from an artist's album, and download ANY song off of an album -- whether or not that particular song is a "single", puts artists at a huge advantage. In the "old days", a single got it's own vinyl pressing, and that was ALL the public heard from an album. If you liked it so much you were curious about the artists other available material, you took a gamble and bought the album. So selling single tracks as opposed to entire albums hasn't changed at all.

 

And the fact that the "album format" is in danger of dying is NOT necessarily a bad thing. I think if an artist is having a creative explosion, and goes into the studio and records a masterpiece song, the faster the public hears it -- the better! Why wait until there is an "album" of material to release it? Making an "album" of material is now optional. I happen to think it's the classiest way to release related material, but it's no longer necessary. Albums used to be necessary due to logistics. I think Chris is being a pessimist. :LOL:

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:stunned: Writing good music takes talent and ability. Period. Those artists that are talented generally get noticed. I think it's great that artists don't necessarily have to rely on corporate record labels for their success anymore.

 

Oh, don't get me wrong. Lots of people out there making their own music can definitely do it very well. There's also lots that don't. Or make computers to make them sound infinitely better. Or hire an enormous team of songwriters, etc.

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Oh, don't get me wrong. Lots of people out there making their own music can definitely do it very well. There's also lots that don't. Or make computers to make them sound infinitely better. Or hire an enormous team of songwriters, etc.

 

(Bolded) Those artists can't perform live though.

 

(Underlined) That aspect of today's music biz is no different than it has always been though.

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Those artists can't perform live though.

 

Yet still they get radio airplay and shoved down everyone's throats.

 

I'd love to share the optimism that music worthy of getting bought/noticed actually will. Focusing more on singles than albums absolutely does make sense because music has become so disposable. Why should bands spend tons of money and take several months to make an album that will just get freely downloaded anyway, when they could just be putting out singles as they get finished? Maybe people are more apt to spend .99 or 1.29 or whatever, than a full album. Aside from this board, of course. I would assume that most of the people here actually bought The 2nd Law, heh.

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I must be in a different part of America then, lol. Radio stations are playing Muse all the time. It's like one of the top artists on radio. And now they're starting to advertise their shows on radio and stuff. And also I know MANY people who actually know Muse and can actually name a pretty decent set of songs.

 

Especially at school too. And it's weird they said they wanted to be more big in America. Today at my college, I heard their B-Sides play through some speakers and everyone could hear them. I was shocked. They were playing Fury and The Groove. I couldn't believe it, haha. :happy:

 

Honestly, I think Muse are already kind of big here. Or at least popular enough for the American audience.

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