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So Muse are not only saving the album format, but rock music altogether? :LOL:

 

But yeah, pretty nice interview.

 

I know you're joking, but it sounded like he's more admitting the band was a bit "old fashioned" even as it got started; and I like how he correlated guitar rock with his same "humanity and technology" theme from the album, really.

Gives another layer of the ideas of losing something important to you.

 

It should also end this odd "eyes closed" argument I'm still for some reason in...

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So Muse are not only saving the album format, but rock music altogether? :LOL:

 

But yeah, pretty nice interview.

From my interpretation, I would say more that Matt thinks the concept of the conventional guitar-bass-drums rock music band is kinda dying out, but the mentality will survive. But its all ideas in Matt's head - maybe rock bands and albums will carry on, and maybe they'll have to adapt a bit more.

 

Saying that, I remember an NME article in 2010 with people in Biffy Clyro and Foals saying the same things.

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From my interpretation, I would say more that Matt thinks the concept of the conventional guitar-bass-drums rock music band is kinda dying out, but the mentality will survive. But its all ideas in Matt's head - maybe rock bands and albums will carry on, and maybe they'll have to adapt a bit more.

 

Saying that, I remember an NME article in 2010 with people in Biffy Clyro and Foals saying the same things.

 

Traditional rock's been dead or dying for quite a while. It just held out longer in some areas than others.

I mean, of course it's morphed into different styles, but that's exactly what he says.

 

And it's taken a real hit by EDM/dance style pop, R&B, etc. and is barely, and rarely, mainstream.

It's pretty amazing Muse is still able to be as big as they are, doing what they do, tbh.

It's going to cripple their ability to play places like the US, in the future, though.

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As a chart thing its the same over here. I guess its why Wolf Alice and Royal Blood (and possibly Catfish and the Bottlemen, but as Oasis broke up and Arctic Monkeys/Kasabian aren't doing anything atm, that crowd needed something like that) getting top 2 debut albums in the UK was a big surprise. Chart radio is mainly full of that stuff - 7 Years by Lukas Graham is wank but was number one for several years, and so is the Drake song called One Dance that has been number one here for 10 weeks, even edging out the much catchier Timberlake "Can't Stop The Feeling" tune.

 

Maybe it is because the only people who buy singles anymore are kids who are more ready to like this sort of stuff, I guess. Certainly, all the singles in Absolution charted in the top 20 - and Stockholm Syndrome would've been #2 if downloads counted in 2003. Since Neutron Star Collision, none has reached the top 20, and loads of other rock bands have struggled too.

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It's just the natural progression of things.

Probably why I latched on to Muse in the first place; they represented the best parts of a genre that was already fading, and incorporated enough different things that they didn't feel like a stale old copy of bygone years. They sort of embodied how I'd always wanted rock music to be, and eschewed the screaming, boring machismo that dominated the genre here for so long.

Although, I think rock was still big in Europe when they came out, no? Thus the popularity differences.

 

Honestly, there's a lot in that article that probably speaks to why I was so strongly attached to them.

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Muse's UK breakthrough was 2001. I'd say 2000's indie was the last real time a form of rock dominated the charts here, and even then in a more dance-inflected variant than what it was in the 90s, but since the talk of "landfill indie" and Scouting for Girls sinking the genre in 2008/09, its struggled to reach the same heights, even if a few buck the trend.

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See I was sure when I read it that it was you, but didn't recognise the name :LOL:

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Yeah its a good piece. Plus 10 years? Fuck that's nuts.

 

Even weirder that I can remember a time when I joined that Black Holes was a black sheep and for a while there was a consensus on here that The Resistance was a better album. How times have changed. :chuckle:

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Yeah its a good piece. Plus 10 years? Fuck that's nuts.

Here are some random facts:

 

1. The time between Showbiz and BH&R is the same as between The Resistance and today.

 

2. The time that had passed from Muse's Glasto gig and when you signed up to this forum is the same as the time between the release of T2L and today.

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Here are some random facts:

 

1. The time between Showbiz and BH&R is the same as between The Resistance and today.

 

2. The time that had passed from Muse's Glasto gig and when you signed up to this forum is the same as the time between the release of T2L and today.

Sounds about right too tbf.

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Ah damnit, I thought I'd scramble some brains.

That's happened so often this year already that I've kinda got no more room to scramble, tbh.

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And then we wonder why they might not want to play certain songs from that time live :LOL:

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Are things different in Europe? Because the crowd around me at the Drones tour was old as balls (for a concert.) :chuckle:

I recall thinking about Glenn's Reapers comment, and Matt's known attitude about us jumping around and remember thinking "well... we are all about 40 years old here..."

 

Seriously, I HATE going to gigs nowdays because I'm the visibly oldest person there, sometimes by a wide margin, but two or three tiers back from me while going to the bathroom, everyone was like 40-50 years old, and no one had their kids. Never felt more comfortable in a crowd.

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There was a pretty decent mix at the Cologne gig. I didn't feel out of place at all, but there were some really young kids there too (who very kindly helped the old dear with creaky knackered knees stand up).

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Maybe they were in seats, but there was no one around me in the GA side I was on at my last gigs that wasn't over 20, at least. Most were considerably older.

 

I got a good look at the crowd when I was trying to get back to my spot after using the bathroom three times. :noey:

 

Considering this is the US, and the band got popular with Twilight and TR, there was a HUGE reaction for TIRO where every single person sung along, and a very good reaction to Hysteria.

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I'd say it was a mix at the O2 - some more middle-aged people, but also some younger people. You can probably guess who it was who started a little moshpit during the Reapers outro.

 

For me, its always been the way, although some have had more younger fans (Reading 2011, The O2 in 2012 - weirdly - and Shepherd's Bush come to mind). Nothing tilted one way or another quite like the full middle aged crowd I saw U2 with, or the younglings crowd for Florence and the Machine.

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I'm used to crowds skewing younger than me, even for older bands.

 

I saw the Bush reunion, or reboot, or whatever tour, and most people there seemed like they weren't born when the band was famous.

 

I thought AFI's crowd was way too young, too, considering how old the band is (even considering their reboot,) and how long ago they were really famous.

They were also a lot dressed in poor goth imitation, and it was just all super uncomfortable.

 

Muse was noticeable to me for how old the average age was.

I pay a lot of attention to these things, because going to concerts at my age embarrasses me to death.

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It freaks me out when I think about how fast time goes by. It feels like only yesterday everyone was like "Omg it's 2010!", and now Muse are considered a veteran band. I'm sure that's pretty hard to deal with as a musician, knowing you've reached your peak already.

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