Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...
Now, let me explain this to you so we can avoid turning it into setlist beef.

 

Muse aren't variating their setlists at all, mixing this up usually meant changing the place of some songs, always keeping the standard 15-17 songs every gig.

 

Now, there have been moments on the tour that had some great setlist in terms of mixing things up, especially in Asia and Australia.

 

What people are complaining about isn't "Why didn't we get this song?", it's "Why didn't ANY of the previous gigs get anything like this(meaning rare songs, not any songs in particular songs)?"

 

If they changed after the Brisbane gig, fair enough. But right after that gig everything went back to the normal, standard set.

 

If you are happy with this, good for you. can't we just leave it at that?

 

Oh and to answer your question about when I think would be a good moment for them to start. How about from the beginning? And since we can't go back in time, how about right now and then keep going like that?

Nah it didn't. Went to Sydney 2 and got Bliss + Butterflies, and the peeps who went to Sydney 1 got CE and Sunburn. Ditto for Melbourne. Slightly disappointed that they didn't use the alternate setlist structure though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nah it didn't. Went to Sydney 2 and got Bliss + Butterflies, and the peeps who went to Sydney 1 got CE and Sunburn. Ditto for Melbourne. Slightly disappointed that they didn't use the alternate setlist structure though.

I'm not allowed to respond to that :phu:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

wow you're a bunch of pompous whiny poms.

 

All bands have generic setlists, why songs remain on their?

a. it pleases the crowd.

b. it becomes soo natural they dont even have to enjoy the song/ worry about mistakes

c. shaky setlists mean no quick transitions, change of stage plans, lighting etc.

 

its more than a band that has to deal with a setlist...

jeesus ur a bunch of pooftas, grow up you 12 year olds. Be grateful your spoilt country is seeing the damn album..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All bands have generic setlists, why songs remain on their?

No they don't.

a. it pleases the crowd.

I've seen Guiding Light, Undisclosed Desires, Resistance, Starlight, Soldier's Poem, Invincible, Feeling Good and Unintended live. Every single one of them, perhaps with the exception of Starlight and Feeling Good, has broken the ebb and flow of the respective gig I heard them at.

 

Also, not all the crowd loves them. Undisclosed Desires in London 2009 was absolutely dead and flat. Don't get me wrong, I love that song, but it just doesn't work live.

b. it becomes soo natural they dont even have to enjoy the song/ worry about mistakes

So auto-pilot is fine?

c. shaky setlists mean no quick transitions, change of stage plans, lighting etc.

Have you been to a Muse gig recently? The gaps between their songs are MASSIVE, often more than a minute. I saw the Manic Street Preachers recently at a fairly large gig and even with guitar changes, speeches, etc, they rarely had any gaps between songs.

 

It doesn't help that Muse are crap at constructing setlists these days. They need to start grouping songs by tuning to save time and stop changing guitars so much! The changes are completely unneccessary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been, and the gaps aren't MASSIVE. Change a guitar doesn't take that long :rolleyes:

 

I agree with this. Although the constant gaps inbetween songs are annoying, they're not really that long. It would be good if Muse did what most other bands did and just went from one song into another with little to no time inbetween, and if they stuck to their own riffs in terms of filling in between songs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been, and the gaps aren't MASSIVE. Change a guitar doesn't take that long :rolleyes:

They are compared with most bands.

 

Live performances by bands of Muse's ilk rely on momentum and once upon a time, Muse understood this :(.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They are compared with most bands.

 

Live performances by bands of Muse's ilk rely on momentum and once upon a time, Muse understood this :(.

 

Come on! :LOL: aren't you overreacting a bit about something as insignificant as this? :p

 

Is true that there's always room for those moments that nobody expects like flying guitars, singers jumping over the drums or destroying them like he did at the last gig I was last year, but that doesn't mean that Muse's performances have never been rehearsed, or, do you think that Matt putting Dom's drums down during some 2004 gigs was spontaneous? Riffs, gaps between songs and standard setlist have always been there, but sadly it looks like some of you have a selective memory.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All I'm saying is that the gaps have got painfully long to accomodate for what I regard as unneccessary, arguably gratuitous, changes of guitar, rehearsed speeches, time to load restrictive lighting and visual programmes, silly noodling that adds guff to gigs, etc.

 

I just think they could sharpen it all up.

 

Watch the opening three songs of Muse at Rock Am Ring 2004 or listen to the Earls Court bootleg again, it's just... better because the gaps are short/non-existant.

 

Matt and Chris should try gigging with just one guitar and bass for a change :LOL:.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dude seriously, every band has excessive time during sets, these are usually filled during jams, solos, jokes, or just blabbering with the crowd.

A band averages 15-20 songs per set

How much time are they assigned? usually 80-120 mins.

How will they fill that time with just songs? how can Matt Bellamy sing 22+ songs without break here and then, I dont think he could... its called re-energizing and I do agree they need more smooth tranisitions but you cant expect them to go, song, song, song, song, break, song, song, song, song break.... etc etc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not saying they should just play non-stop :LOL:.

 

But 30 to 60 second gaps between nearly every song (on average through the gig, ofc) is just a bit silly.

 

The riffs are another matter altogether. I don't mind them per se but again, over a whole gig, you could fit in about three extra original songs.

 

Look at the 2009 Resistance Tour, the average gig length was about 16 songs with few, if any, rarities whatsoever. Had they cut back on the riffs/sharpened up the timings, they could have rotated songs like Sunburn, Bliss, Citizen Erased, Butterflies & Hurricanes, etc.

 

Put it this way; I just think Muse have become A BIT complacent in regards to their live performances in the wake of winning every live act award on the planet. Again, I'm not saying they didn't deserve them back between 2001 and 2005 when they were genuinely incredible live (retaining the spontenaity and pace), but since then, it's all become a bit bloated what with the massive shows, UFOs, lasers, walkways, plinths, acrobats, etc.

 

That's all folks :).

 

I'm hoping running through OoS might just bring their minds back to where they were at that time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All I'm saying is that the gaps have got painfully long to accomodate for what I regard as unneccessary, arguably gratuitous, changes of guitar, rehearsed speeches, time to load restrictive lighting and visual programmes, silly noodling that adds guff to gigs, etc.

 

Wait, what?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...