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The definitive "What order should my FX pedals be placed in?" thread


zeuzman

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Why not?

 

Just not the place I would want it. When I'm ordering my pedals, I always think of it in terms of what order I want my signal to be affected. For example, I have my Whammy after my Overdrive because I want the already distorted guitar signal to be pitch shifted, I don't want the clean signal to be pitch shifted and then distorted. Which is why I would have the phaser much later in the chain. If you have it first like you said, you're getting an extremely uneven signal going into all the rest of your pedals.

 

But I know you don't like to be disagreed with, so ;)

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Just not the place I would want it. When I'm ordering my pedals, I always think of it in terms of what order I want my signal to be affected. For example, I have my Whammy after my Overdrive because I want the already distorted guitar signal to be pitch shifted, I don't want the clean signal to be pitch shifted and then distorted. Which is why I would have the phaser much later in the chain. If you have it first like you said, you're getting an extremely uneven signal going into all the rest of your pedals.

 

But I know you don't like to be disagreed with, so ;)

 

You put your Whammy in a place that's going to be the worst possible place for it?

 

It looks for fundamentals, distorted signals confuse the hell out of it.

 

 

With phasers it just depends on whether you like the old school uni-vibe/rotary cabinet feel or the "modern" sound.

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@Haze, what about with the fuzz factory/fuzz probe?

 

I'm avoiding buying a fuzz probe because I'm not sure if it'll work well in my setup as there's a whammy.

 

Good for noise and really scary amounts of treble if you like scaring the shit out of people, otherwise, useless. No different to any other pedal of a similar nature.

 

Otherwise, your ears are either fucked or you're not listening to your set up in the right way.

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I've always been told the FF should be first in the chain, but...I don't know, maybe it's best to see what way works best. I think I've got the rest of the order sorted at least.

 

MFC...

 

whammy

wah probe

phase 90

 

put the delay in your FX loop.

 

As for the fuzz factory, I don't know - that's what I'm currently trying to decide on with my own setup

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Yeah exactly...

 

Who the fuck wants their whammy to sound like its supposed to...?

 

:rolleyes:

 

The pedal will move all frequencies in the signal going into it by whatever amount. If the signal has lots of harmonics (Which is introduced by distortion), then all that gets moved up by say, an octave and sounds horribly trebly. Not very nice for audiences at all.

 

The earlier it is in your chain, the better.

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:rolleyes:

 

The pedal will move all frequencies in the signal going into it by whatever amount. If the signal has lots of harmonics (Which is introduced by distortion), then all that gets moved up by say, an octave and sounds horribly trebly. Not very nice for audiences at all.

 

The earlier it is in your chain, the better.

 

Which is why you have to pay attention to your EQ and amp settings. The amount of treble introduced is minimal, and shifting a note up by 2 octaves is always going to sound harsh regardless, so yeah its an issue if you're a fucking idiot and are too lazy to actually check your sound.

 

So the moral of the story is... don't be lazy.

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I've always been told the FF should be first in the chain, but...I don't know, maybe it's best to see what way works best. I think I've got the rest of the order sorted at least.

 

MFC...

 

whammy

wah probe

phase 90

 

put the delay in your FX loop.

 

As for the fuzz factory, I don't know - that's what I'm currently trying to decide on with my own setup

 

I'd put the FF first, and then yeah I'll try that.

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Which is why you have to pay attention to your EQ and amp settings. The amount of treble introduced is minimal, and shifting a note up by 2 octaves is always going to sound harsh regardless, so yeah its an issue if you're a fucking idiot and are too lazy to actually check your sound.

 

So the moral of the story is... don't be lazy.

 

:stunned:

 

Sounds like you need to start listening to your setup and spout less arrogant nonsense.

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:stunned:

 

Sounds like you need to start listening to your setup and spout less arrogant nonsense.

 

Yessss, speaking from personal experience is spouting arrogant nonsense...

 

I spend plenty of time listening to my setup, I dont really have a choice. Putting a drive pedal before a whammy pedal does not have a shitty enough effect to fuck up your sound and make the audience hate you. Yeah, there is a slight amount more treble, but the same thing happens if I, um, turn up the treble nob.

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Yessss, speaking from personal experience is spouting arrogant nonsense...

 

I spend plenty of time listening to my setup, I dont really have a choice. Putting a drive pedal before a whammy pedal does not have a shitty enough effect to fuck up your sound and make the audience hate you. Yeah, there is a slight amount more treble, but the same thing happens if I, um, turn up the treble nob.

 

If you think there's only a slight amount more treble, sounds like there's something wrong with your ears.

 

Turning down the treble doesn't help anything. This all just reads like a typical guitarist who doesn't understand their equipment trying to make excuses. Distortion pedals increase treble frequencies, the whammy has the ability to shift those boosted frequencies by up to 2 octaves, moving those frequencies to a place they were never meant to be, making the already harsher sound, even harsher. This can't be remedied by a twist of the treble on the amp's EQ as it has a negative impact on the rest of the sound when you aren't using the whammy.

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:rolleyes:

 

The pedal will move all frequencies in the signal going into it by whatever amount. If the signal has lots of harmonics (Which is introduced by distortion), then all that gets moved up by say, an octave and sounds horribly trebly. Not very nice for audiences at all.

 

The earlier it is in your chain, the better.

 

What's your point? That's exactly the same situation as shifting it up then distorting it (assuming no massive treble rolloff on the pedal).

In fact from personal experience, I always found putting the whammy second reduced treble as the frequency response is a bit shit.

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