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Found 245 results

  1. Has this been posted yet? http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1652821/20101122/muse_uk_.jhtml -- There's a short interview clip on that page as well.
  2. I've been translating this interview in my spare time… I'm still learning German and am not fluent at all so sorry about any mistakes. Anyway, it's by the same person that did this awesome interview/game, and while it's not nearly as funny, I hope it's still an interesting read, even if all the information is old. ---source: http://www.visions.de/artists/stories/4050/1/muse--- PLANET MUSE by Sascha Krüger Much these days is said and written about the new Muse album, “Black Holes & Revelations”, especially about innovations, variations, revolutions. Fact is, in the four years since “Absolution,” the three main actors have developed enormously—as musicians, characters, and people. From that tells this story. Three personal interviews with drummer Dominic Howard, bassist Chris Wolstenholme, and frontman Matthew Bellamy were the basis for this, whose central message here should stand for themselves. Three actors and their way with Muse, their roles, their interests and their relationship to each other. Dominic - the sudden adult Originally we didn't want it, but then it came this way anyway: We toured with “Absolution” at the end of another two years, with many good, but also difficult moments. For me quite particularly, because my father died almost exactly in the middle of this time. As a result, I am going back and forth between the extremes of pure joy and lightheartedness over it, what befell us, to the moment of deep sorrow and acute crises of the mind. But the day of his death is exemplary: after a really overwhelming gig I came from the stage and got the terrible news. Surreal—there's no other way to describe this feeling. The good from this was that I really got to know my friends—it was really amazing how much my so-called friends did not know. Chris was a notable support in this time—he lost his father when he was 17, and therefore he knew that one didn't need to say anything; it is enough that someone is there and takes you in the arm when you need it. And in a strange way, I had become more confident from this death because when you lose someone who stood so close, then you learn to appreciate all the more what you have. But other things were also intense. On this tour were more injuries; for example, Matt tore half his lip on our first gig in our first US tour in five years, so we had to cancel the next few gigs. This had us so pulled down, we thought seriously that it was a sign that we should check off America. Just a few weeks later Chris broke his left hand, and we had to grapple with a backup bassist. It was terrible—and this was when we headlined V Festival. We sounded like a piece of shit. And during a gig as Matt, in mania, just missed a few cuts on my face with his guitar neck, we thought for a moment: okay, we should really let the tour go. This was all very tragic for the band. The trick is to learn to see the positive in all the tragedy, and in that concern, I have definitely matured. Without this knowledge I would have become very sad for a very long time. Quite concretely the band had helped me through this—by the concerts that we played, and the feedback that came back. Through this I have learned above all the simple aspect of time: that one remains to learn to appreciate everything. When we then subjected ourselves practically directly after the US Tour to France into the dilapidated Château Miraval, all was clear: it had to happen. It must be something new coming, something that surprised ourselves. We have made music back as we did before the debut: simply play, try it out, and talk about it afterwards. At the same time it was quite different, because now existed between us an unconscious level of communication that made talking about many aspects unnecessary. Now we simply knew and felt when something is right. Quickly we established that the result can only be called versatility. From the moment we had set all this, we pushed this aspect in relation to sound, arrangement, production techniques, and influences. At the end of every single song there existed a complete individual recording setup with instruments, effects, and even the recording rooms included. It had never yielded so many experiments from us before—experiments with a totally clear objective, however. What else will I accomplish someday? I would like to, for example, eventually make my diving instructor’s certificate. Diving is my new passion. One cannot find a closer feeling to the endless expanse of the universe. Such a foreign world exists underwater directly on this planet. And it is so good to feel yourself weightless, which is a state that I would love to feel continuously. Chris - the down-to-earth one Nowadays we are not a band who plans the next album with military precision. Perhaps it would be better because we would make ourselves less vulnerable, but we don’t work like this. And I don’t know now if we should; while one composes, one records and recycles. So many unpredictable things happen that are good for the process that a plan would only give yourself unnoticed limitations. The only thing that was clear, and also what we already said to you at the last album, is that this album must sound different. The previous Muse way was definitely exhausted. In retrospect, “Absolution” had turned out to be too thoughtful an album for us; it gave very little room for surprises. We wanted to stay explicitly away from that. An album full of surprises even for ourselves: this seemed the right way to us. And yet it’s all held together, simply because this album represents us in our current situation, which naturally is very different from for four years ago during the time of “Absolution”. The reason why we continue to believe absolutely in what we are doing is quite simple: we have endless fun with it. For this reason alone it can’t be wrong. It is amazing, how little has changed fundamentally since we practiced Nirvana songs in the rehearsal room in Devon when we were 15 or 16. The process has literally remained exactly the same. And also fundamentally the same drive: never be too serious or too grim, even if today one hardly still wants to believe. Of course we take our matters seriously, but the background has remained the same: pure fun on matters, new things, new songs, new sounds to try. In some ways we are now naturally like an old married couple. For example, when we record our albums, for the period of production we always draw back to an extremely quiet spot, somewhere no one can bother us. Exactly as long as until we get on each other’s nerves. And then we change to a big city and record everything under a self-imposed deadline. This time it was three weeks straight in New York, then we had enough songs for a double album in the box. Why do I speak only about the band and not about me here? Quite honestly, I think I am a rather boring type. There is very little that is worth mentioning about me that would distinguish me from an average Joe. I love my children, I love my family, I still like to sit in the front yard of my house in my small hometown and I look forward to weekends on my boat. In some way I am probably the most necessary balancing opposite to Matt; whenever he works on something or grapples with something intensive , he is truly a mad professor. Naturally that is a special strength of Muse that he always allowed himself. He tries out things that are absolutely and completely crazy and over the top, not to mention mad. Although, instinctively he always knows that these actions can never be a part of our music, but once you balance his first time with my pragmatism, out of that arises a balance that produces something in the end that is not so crazy. Let’s call it simply a marriage of the brilliant with the down-to-earth. It’s not bad when someone clowns around for many hours long with two million synthesizers as long as someone says in the end, “That was all rubbish, except for that one melody.” That is my part.
  3. http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/nov/11/take-that-progress-cd-review "Progress takes their sound closer to that of the Killers (the blaring arena-rocker Underground Machine), Scissor Sisters (the glam stomp of Happy Now) and even Supermassive Black Hole-era Muse (the alienated electro marching tune Kidz)." http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/music/reviews/album-take-that-progress-polydor-2133933.html "The real star here is producer Stuart (Madonna's Music)Price, who manages to turn the band into a different act for every song: Muse here, Bowie there, and everywhere an electro-pop sheen and a camp and knowing smile. (And not, note to Robbie, a smirk)." http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/reviews/qvwx "The latter sounds like he’s having a ball throughout, particularly on another Owen/Williams duet, Kidz, which exhilaratingly combines martial beats, glam guitars, Atari techno and the kind of absurd dystopian pomp ("Daggers of science evolving into violence / We're not sure where the fallout blows") usually found on Muse albums." http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/nov/14/take-that-progress-kitty-empire-review "You suspect it's down to Robbie's grandiosity and paranoiac tendencies that it also sounds like Queen and Muse." I can definitely see the resemblance. Can anyone else?
  4. DISCLAIMER: You must know basic music theory to understand this! Alright, well this doesn't mean much, but I just thought it's very interesting and is more than a coincidence. During the song "Piano Thing", Matt "Arpeggiates" a certain chord. It's at about 17 seconds in. This chord is an FmAdd9, which is the notes: F(Root), G(Ninth), Ab(Minor Third), C(Perfect Fifth). Now, the beginning piano lick in Ruled by Secrecy goes like this: "C, G#, G, F, G, G#" then repeats itself. This is the exact same chord as the chord in piano thing. I think Matt was playing around with chords he liked (such as the FmAdd9) and came up with the intro to Ruled by Secrecy. Don't bother asking how I figured this out. I do have quite a bit of spare time. Discuss.
  5. The Devon-upon-Entire Universe trio Muse have been coming here for years, and though they’ve been progressively growing in stature and nipping at U2’s heels in the So Big It’s Ridiculous Stakes, their performances have never been anything less than amazing. The band will be back in the antipodes with their mind-bending, visually arresting and American-conquering Resistance tour in the next month. Drummer and occasional Dominic Howard phoned in from New York to tell fans what to expect this time around, why rotating 360-degree risers aren’t as fun as they look and how recording bass drum sounds in a swimming pool is a totally legitimate thing to do, even when said pool is full. “Well, you know, arenas, not stadiums. Like what they play basketball in and stuff.” There is, apparently a difference. Howard, humble rock star that he is, would like to point out that Muse are currently playing an arena, rather than a stadium tour across the US of A. Not that it makes much difference when you consider the kind of set-up the band has going at the moment. For Howard and bandmates Matt Bellamy and Chris Wolstenholme to put their current show on the road, they need no less than eighty crew members travelling with a custom-made stage. “Sometimes you can turn up and the stage is already there,” Dom jokes, “but that doesn’t work for us.” That might have something to do with the ridiculous set-up the boys have going at the moment, which includes purpose-built skyscrapers for each player, enough lights to blind an entire invading alien army and, you know, a giant UFO with an acrobat inside it. The Devon-upon-Entire Universe trio Muse have been coming here for years, and though they’ve been progressively growing in stature and nipping at U2’s heels in the So Big It’s Ridiculous Stakes, their performances have never been anything less than amazing. The band will be back in the antipodes with their mind-bending, visually arresting and American-conquering Resistance tour in the next month. Drummer and occasional Dominic Howard phoned in from New York to tell fans what to expect this time around, why rotating 360-degree risers aren’t as fun as they look and how recording bass drum sounds in a swimming pool is a totally legitimate thing to do, even when said pool is full. “Well, you know, arenas, not stadiums. Like what they play basketball in and stuff.” There is, apparently a difference. Howard, humble rock star that he is, would like to point out that Muse are currently playing an arena, rather than a stadium tour across the US of A. Not that it makes much difference when you consider the kind of set-up the band has going at the moment. For Howard and bandmates Matt Bellamy and Chris Wolstenholme to put their current show on the road, they need no less than eighty crew members travelling with a custom-made stage. “Sometimes you can turn up and the stage is already there,” Dom jokes, “but that doesn’t work for us.” That might have something to do with the ridiculous set-up the boys have going at the moment, which includes purpose-built skyscrapers for each player, enough lights to blind an entire invading alien army and, you know, a giant UFO with an acrobat inside it. “So it’s actually a massive helium sphere,” explains Dom, “which is controlled by two guys with ropes because naturally it just wants to float off back into space. It looks so cool and it looks good for us, too, because we have something to get distracted with given that nobody’s looking at us at that point in the song!” The subtle difference between a stadium and an arena tour, then, “is the amount of crazy shit we get to pull off. Like in Europe, we had this massive spaceship docking on the stage and we’d walk out of it.” Howard is nevertheless wary about the prospect of bringing the UFO to Australia, “We are doing one outdoor gig in Perth, though, so they might get lucky.” The rest of the bells and whistles, however, are on their way over, including the best ‘party trick’ of all, the skyscrapers. Nobody has it worse (or better, depending on your ability to deal with heights and motion sickness) than Howard, whose drum riser not only propels up to five metres off the ground, but also spins around, while he’s playing. “When they stop [at the top] they kind of shake and wobble…it was slightly nauseating,” he says, “The whole drum riser also rotates around 360, so I can face the entire audience who are behind the stage; to be honest, that’s a bit weird. Looks cool, but it really puts me off a bit. Most times I just try to close my eyes, try and remember where the drums are!” The interests of their fans, who plainly are the kind of people buying seats behind the stage, have really always been Muse’s priority. It’s the reason that they’ve got a massive website with over 300,000 members that’s growing every day, their own Wiki which is constantly being updated with everything from the type of guitar Bellamy plays through to Dom’s brief fling with pink pants and a forum full of diehards, many of whom follow the band across the Continent whenever they embark on another tour. “Oh yeah,” Dom laughs, “we get lots of travellers. There are those people who will come to a huge bunch of gigs. It’s great, sometimes you see them again and you get to say hello, and if they’re cool, you can hang out and meet them properly. We do get that sort of… reaction. Our fans are either diehard passionate or they hate us, but we don’t get a lot of middle ground.” In case you haven’t heard The Resistance, Space Dementia or perhaps their latest polarising opus, Neutron Star Collision (Love Is Forever), Muse don’t do a lot of middle ground recording, either. Fans have famously retold the story of how the band cut Absolution opener Apocalypse Please underwater, and Howard is on hand to confirm the rumour. “We were in this studio in Ireland and really isolated,” he says, “and we were just trying out all the different rooms for sound, as you do. The hotel’s swimming pool was great, though, because it supplied this massive reverb. I set up some bass drums and got in the pool to play them, ‘cause that was the most comfortable thing to do.” Its kind of what you’d expect from a band that cut a three-part symphony on their latest record. “We do a lot of experiments with old and rusty things and we hit them to see what happens,” Howard admits, “a lot of the time, nothing happens.” America is strange place for Muse, having only recently warmed to the group properly, in light of their involvement in the Twilight films. Dom admits it’s strange playing songs like Plug-In Baby, New Born and Feeling Good that weren’t even released in the States the first time around. Unlike Australian audiences, who Howard believes he could play Muscle Museum to and they’d know most of the words, most Yanks only own the band’s last two albums, so they’re being re-taught the back catalogue. That being said, the band’s most recent accolades, including Best Riff of The Past Decade and Best Cover of All Time certainly haven’t hindered the recognition of their more classic cuts. But Howard still believes in the power of the tunes themselves: “ Plug-In Baby is juts one of those songs that when you hear it, it’s just so upbeat and positive in its vibe, that you don’t really need to know it to kind of understand what we’re doing. You don’t need much training for that one!” Australian fans of Muse will also be interested to note that this may be the last time they’ll see the band for a while; after almost ten years without either touring or writing, Dom reveals they’re hoping to take a bit of siesta next year. “Generally we’re going to take it easy I think, and maybe think about some new stuff towards the end of the year,” he says, “We might play a few gigs in places we haven’t been to in ages, like South America or Eastern Europe, but other than that, maybe just kick back and reflect.” And that’s a good thing, because really, there’s no worse a place to kick back and reflect than on a twirling drum riser, five metres above the Earth. Original link: http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/features/26402/Muse
  6. Okay, so my Muse obsession is negatively affecting my school performance. My parents are starting to get really annoyed with me. I never do ANY homework because I just listen to music (mainly Muse) all the time and watch Muse videos on Youtube! It's not okay! I want to stop but I keep ending up going back to listening to music! How do I go about changing? I need balancee!
  7. What do you buy Mister Bellamy for christmas, I need to know and I figured the diehard fans would be the best people to come to for advice.
  8. Thoughts? House of the Rising Sun is probably my favourite.
  9. So, I went to Europe last summer, and I was on a bus with a bunch of people driving through France or something. I had been listening to my iPod and I was just starting to fall asleep, when someone made an anouncement on a microphone. It startled me so much that I jumped in my seat. At that moment, I hear on my iPod, "And it scares the hell out of me..."
  10. The 2011 Annual GRAMMY Awards will take place at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, CA on February 13 and will be broadcast on CBS. Ballots are due from voting members of the Academy on November 3 and nominations will be announced on December 1. "Uprising" was released as a single in August 2009 and therefore under the Grammy rules it appears it cannot be nominated for any 2011 song categories. However, both the album "The Resistance" and the single "Resistance" are eligible and are listed on the ballot in several categories including rock. Also, three Muse videos including "Uprising", "Resistance" and NSC are under consideration by voters for best short-form video. Rock acts such as Kings of Leon, Coldplay and Green Day have been nominated and won Grammys in the past several years in various categories including the three major ones: Record, Song and Album of the Year. Foo Fighters, RHCP and Radiohead have also recently been nominated for Album of the Year. Usually a rock album makes the final cut as one of the five nominees.
  11. My band is after a good one word catchy name?? Any thoughts?? Or anything you got
  12. Okay... Which one of you is responsible for this? http://memegenerator.net/Perv-Bellamy/ImageMacro/3290848/IVE-SEEN-YOU-NAKED Own up... (I like how it's in the 'proper' tier)
  13. Top 10 Muse on NME TV now Goes off at 9am Channel 382 Undisclosed Desires is on now
  14. What do you think? I really like Eurovision Song Contest. I am also very aware that many people find the music there absolutely atrocious. Being an open Eurovision fan, I've heard tons of critisism. But really. It would have been so amazing if Muse were to participate. For the United Kingdom! Since they are very well known in Europe, they would score lots of extra attention beforehand. Then, they would write a killer-3-minute long tune, and would have rocked Europe with it, winning the contest, and become known to every child, father and grandfather who watches Eurovision but have no clue about Muse. Muse also loves a good scene show, and that's an area Eurovision is really good at. I sometimes imagine they playing United States of Eurasia, and that they recieve a bunch of 12 points. (The rules would have to be changed slightly because one cannot perform on instruments in Eurovision, and we know how Muse reacts to that.)
  15. Absolution or The Resistance? Absolution - Apocalypse Please - Butterflies & Hurricanes - Endlessly - Ruled By Secrecy The Resistance - United States of Eurasia - I Belong to You - Cross-Pollination - Redemption That.... is one tough cookie As much as I love the aforementioned tracks from The Resistance, Absolution contains so much bombast that it wins out. It seems like that album was structured around the piano tracks (with the exception of Endlessly), giving them more weighting. Absolution it is!
  16. Muse is nominated in categories Anthem of the year and Best headliner!!! Go Go Go VOTE!!! http://eu.festivalawards.com/
  17. if your gonna hate on it, dont post we know its not real http://www.nme.com/blog/index.php?blog=10&p=9270&title=cool_list_countdown_70_52&more=1&c=1 the key bits so far 69. Matt Bellamy, Muse He goes out with a movie star (Kate Hudson) and plays guitar like a Jimi Hendrix for the Virgin Galactic age. Not even the fact that Muse contributed a song to that lame Twilight film can diminish our admiration for their outrageously gifted frontman. 66. Cher Lloyd Why is she in the Cool List? Allow Jaimie Hodgson to explain. 51. Josh Homme OK, he's not done a whole lot of note this year, aside from touring with Them Crooked Vultures, but the man known to his QOTSA bandmates as "the ginger Elvis" will always be at least 15% cooler than the average American rocker. can only imagine what the reaction to Cher will be I feel like such a troll
  18. 16 Muse songs made it into XFM's top 1,000 songs of all time. http://www.xfm.co.uk/news/2010/the-top-1000-songs-of-all-time-ab
  19. Muse have been nominated in the Best Alternative Rock Artist category at this year's American Music Awards! The awards take place on Sunday 21st November 2010, voting is open now on the link below and closes on Friday November 12th so make sure you get your votes in before then! Source: http://muse.mu/news/article/715/muse-nominated-for-an-american-music-award/
  20. In your opinion, what do you think is the most beautiful Muse song? I know there are many Muse songs that are considered to be beautiful. Maybe some are seen as more beautiful than others. I'd just love to hear other people's opinions. I think Hyper Chondriac Music is hauntingly beautiful. I love it way more than Hyper Music because I find that the slowness of the song creates some sort of atmospheric vibe. Whenever I hear it, I just get lost in the song. It's actually my favourite Muse song
  21. Muse got a nomination for Favorite Alternative Rock Artist, up against Phoenix & Vampire Weekend. AMA's this year are on Nov. 21, & voting is open until Nov. 12. Vote here: http://abc.go.com/shows/american-music-awards/vote?vid=3052
  22. I have looked and haven't seen anything posted in this forum about this. I know we do the twitter list aka sexy plane for the shows but what about people doing live audio feeds thru their cell phones to sites such as : http://en.1000mikes.com/?? This is done for almost all of the U2 shows. I would say there is always someone who does it for about 95 percent of the shows.. Audio can be lower quality but at least we all can here it live online and experience along with the musers at the show. Has this ever been done? If so what happened? What are your thoughts on this.. I think it would be pretty awesome if we started doing this or at least gave it a try at a couple of shows.
  23. Heeeey! I was inspired while back, and i made myself a Manson Glitterati pendant. I loved it. And i thought, maybe other people would love it too. So i made a few, and i put them up for sale here. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=290491674779 Ive also made earrings and a bunch of his other guitars. (:
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